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Roman Coins For Sale - For Modern milled British coins, visit www.predecimal.com

Coin Sale terms - To view any of the coins below, click on the smaller picture to reveal a larger image. To purchase any of the Roman coins below please use the 'Buy this coin' link to the right of the description. When you have finished adding coins to your order you may use the 'Checkout' option above to pay for your order, either by credit card or other means. 

Postage is charged at 3% of the order value for UK customers and at 6% of the Order value for US/World customers. The postage cost is always for the most insured method of sending and will automatically be added to your order before you make payment. if you have any special requirements there is a space to write them in the Checkout area.

POSTAGE IS FREE ON ALL ORDERS OVER £150

Please email me if you have any questions or contact me using the link below.

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Macrinus                                                           
(217-8)  Silver Tetradrachm of Beroea (Aleppo) in Cyrrhestica (Syria). Macrinus rose from humble obscurity in Mauritania to become ruler of the Roman world.  His reign, however, lasted just 14 months before being executed by his own troops.  A large (25mm) attractive coin with pleasant, though faintly struck portrait.

Price £98

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Elagabalus                                                           
(218-222)  AE27 of Odessus in Thrace.  The reverse depicts Serapis with cornucopia.                        Elagabalus was described by Seth R Stevenson as "One of the most cruel, debauched and shameless wretches, that ever disgraced humanity".

Price £36

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Elagabalus                                                           
(218-222)  Silver denarius, the reverse depicting Abundance emptying cornucopia.

Price £48

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Aquilia Severa   
After divorcing Julia Paula, Elagabalus shocked the Roman world by announcing he was to marry a Vestal Virgin Aquilia Severa.  This was a unique occurrence, as the usual punishment for a Vestal Virgin breaking her 30 year vow of celibacy was to be buried alive.  Possibly due to the disgust aroused by this marriage, he quickly divorced Severa, but returned to her for the final few months before his assassination.   Her own attitude towards the marriage is unclear, although some contemporary sources indicate that she was forced to marry against her will.  Others allege rape, though some modern historians contend that there was a certain amount of genuine affection between the two.  Cassius Dio, however, wrote that Elagabalus had a more stable relationship with his (male) chariot driver than with any of his wives.  Toned silver denarius, with reasonable portrait.  the reverse depicts Concordia.

Price £285 SOLD

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Elagabalus & Julia Maesa   
(218-222)  AE28 of Marcianopolis in Moesia Inferior (Northern Black Sea Coast), the reverse depicting Homonoia.

Price £36

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Severus Alexander (222-35)                                   Severus ruled from 222-235.   He was rather under the thumb of his mother Julia Mamaea, but whoever it was that had the final say, his rule was just and fair and their murder by troops under the "Thracian savage" Maximinus, shocked the Roman world.  According to historian Seth Stevenson, Alexander was "the father of his country, the friend of his subjects" and there are not many Roman Emperors who could claim that.  Maybe it was simply the influence of Julia. 
Silver denarius of this comparatively good Emperor.  The reverse shows Romulus advancing with spear and trophy. Good portrait.

Price £39

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Severus Alexander  (222-35
AE27 of Tomis in Moesia Inferior on the Black Sea coast.  The reverse depicts Hygena feeding a serpent held in her arms.  

Price £32

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Julia Mamaea
Mother of Severus Alexander who exerted much influence over her son and was murdered with him in 225 AD.  Denarius, the reverse depicting Vesta.

Price £36

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 Maximinus I (235-238)
Silver denarius with nice portrait.   The reverse depicts the Emperor standing between 2 standards.

Price £68

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Gordian III (238-244)
Base Silver antoninianus. The reverse depicts Laetitia standing holding sceptre and wreath. S8617. (Rome 241-3)

Price £32

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Gordian III (238-244) and Tranquillina
AE 26 of Tomis in Moesia Inferior.  The obverse with facing portraits of Gordian and his wife, the reverse depicting Zeus seated. Gordian became Emperor when still in his teens, but showed remarkable military skill when defeating the Persian ruler Shapur and ejecting the Persian army from Mesopotamia. Gordian seemed to be destined for a long and peaceful rule, but his popularity with the troops was undermined by Philip and he was murdered at Zeila, on the Euphrates when still only 21.  

Price £58

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Philip I (244-249)
Base Silver antoninianus of Philip I, the reverse depicting Aequitas.  Philip was born in the Arabian town of Bostra and his father has been called a "Captain of Robbers", although he was probably a man of some local importance.  He rose through the ranks and persuaded Gordian to make him Praetorian Prefect after secretly orchestrating the death of the incumbent. After the death of Gordian he assumed the purple, but he was killed at Verona by the troops of Trajan Decius after a reign of barely 5 years.

Price £38

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Philip I I
(244-49) Base silver antoninianus of Philip II as Caesar (244-247) Rev depicts Philip II holding globe and spear.

Price £54

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Trajan Decius
(249-251) Decius was born in Pannonia.  A very able administrator and an excellent military leader, he was sent by Philip I  to suppress rebellious troops in the Balkans, but without his knowledge or consent, he was proclaimed Emperor by those same troops.  Under threat of death, he led this army against Philip and defeated him near Verona. He was a notable and cruel opponent of Christianity which, according to Gibbon, he regarded as "a recent and criminal superstition".  Decius became the first Emperor to die in battle against a foreign enemy, when he was killed in a desperate fight against the Goths in a swamp near modern Razgrad in Bulgaria.   Antoninianus with good portrait, the reverse depicting Abundentia standing & emptying cornucopiae.

Price £48

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Herennia Etruscilla
The wife of Trajan Decius. Silver antoninianus, the reverse depicting Pudicitia (Modesty) seated and holding her veil in a very modest way..

Price £48

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Herennius Etruscus
The eldest son of Trajan Decius. Silver antoninianus, struck in Rome whilst he was Caesar 250-251 AD. Killed alongside his father a month or so after being proclaimed Emperor in the early summer of 251 AD.  The reverse depicts Spes holding flower and raising skirt.

Price £68

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Trebonianus Gallus
(251-253)  Antoninianus, the reverse depicting Pietus

Price £29

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Volusian
(251-253)  Antoninianus, the reverse depicting Salus feeding serpent her arms.  Ex Duke of Argyll Collection.

Price £46

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Valerian
(253-261)  Antoninianus, the reverse depicting Felicitas holding caduceius and cornucopia. Valerian was captured by the Persian King Shapur I and had a distinctly miserable time in captivity, being used as a footstool when Shapur mounted his horse.  When Valerian eventually died, it is said that Shapur had him stuffed.

Price £28

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Gallienus
(253-268)  Antoninianus.  The reverse depicts an antelope and although the poor creature appears to have no legs, I think you can put that down to the fact that this is a poorly made series.

Price £11

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Salonina
  Antoninianus, Wife of Gallienus, the reverse depicting Venus holding sceptre and child.

Price £29

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